SYNTHETIC LIFTING SLINGS & TOWING STROPS

WHICH TYPE SHOULD BE USED?

LOAD MASS

This is the most obvious consideration when choosing a sling to lift a given load. The user must ensure a sling is chosen that has the appropriate WLL
(Working Load Limit) in the intended configuration to lift the load. Refer to the appropriate sling WLL charts in this brochure or in the relevant Australian
Standard.

HEADROOM

Where minimum headroom is available, a user should consider:

  • Using shorter slings.
  • If wire rope slings are used, there is a minimum length allowance in AS 1666 for slings using mechanically swaged eyes.
  • Double part grommets may be used.
  • Chain slings can be kept to very short lengths.
  • Using a lifting beam.
  • Increasing the included angle of multiple slings.

FREQUENCY OF USE – LIFE OF SLING

  • This will depend on the number of times a sling is used and the manner in which the sling is used.
  • Chain slings provide longer life.
  • Superflex plaited slings reduce kinking in comparison with conventional wire rope slings.
  • Synthetic slings have special value in some chemically hazardous applications and for protection of the load to be lifted.

TYPE OF LOAD

Chain and conventional wire rope slings are the most appropriate for
abrasive surfaces.

  • Where a positive choking grip is required Superflex plaited slings, Round slings or Webbing slings are the best choice.
  • Where marring of items is a problem, Webbing slings, Round slings or covered Flat Woven Wire slings are most satisfactory.

COST VERSUS EFFICIENCY

  •  A wire rope sling is an economical sling per tonne of WLL but after
    several uses in a choking application wire rope slings develop kinks,
    which make them more difficult to handle.
  • For quick, easy and safe handling, Superflex slings, Grade T chain
    slings, Round slings and Webbing slings can save many dollars in
    time and reduce injury.

AVAILABLE STORAGE FOR SLINGS

  • All slings are best stored vertically so their length and condition can
    be readily inspected. There is also less chance of water or corrosion
    damage and mechanical damage. The WLL of each sling can also be
    readily ascertained.

WARNING

Slings should always be used in line with good rigging practice and as per the manufacturers recommendations.

  •  Incorrect sling use could result in a dangerous situation that could cause property damage, serious injury or death.
  • Increasing the included angle of multiple leg sling assemblies derates the sling. Therefore higher capacity slings will be required.
  • Never use a sling with an included angle in excess of 120 degrees.

All synthetic slings must be inspected every 3 months. Contact Ranger on 1300 SLINGS to arrange your inspection.

INSPECTION BEFORE USE

FLAT WEBBING SLINGS

The following signs of damage should be looked for during inspections.

1. External wear – caused by dragging over rough surfaces causes an opening out of surface fibres (with a furry appearance). The outer faces of the webbing my become so worn that yarns in the weave are severed. The label may become damaged.

2. Local abrasion – Local abrasion will be caused by movement over sharp edges while the sling is under tension, which will result in a loss of strength.

3. Cuts and contusions – may be indicated by local rupturing or loosening of the yarns.

4. Internal wear – will be caused by repeated flexing, particularly when particles of grit or dirt have penetrated the fibres. The presence of grit or dirt may indicate internal wear.

5. Damage to protective coating or sleeve – Any damage to a protective coating or sleeve can allow damage to the sling.

6. Damage from high temperatures – High temperatures can result from a hot environment, radiation or friction. High enough temperatures will cause fusing or shrinkage of synthetic webbing. Fusion is able to occur at temperatures approximately equal to the melting point of the polymer from which the fibres have been made.

7. Sunlight degradation – Prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation (including sunlight) of any textile fibres will weaken the fibres. Degradation may be indicated by a hairy appearance of fibres.

8. Chemical attack – Chemical attack is usually indicated by the local weakening or softening of the webbing material In some cases it may cause some stiffening of the sling.In extreme cases surface fibres are reduced to powder.

9. Other Factors – Label damage, Deterioration of stitching, Damage of any eyes, Damage at the connection to any terminal attachment, Damage to any end fittings

ROUND SLINGS

Every time a sling is to be used, the user must be satisfied that the sling does not show any signs of damage that could affect its safe use. Slings shall be withdrawn from service immediately if they sustain any of the following faults:

1. The cover has been damaged.

2. The stitching has been damaged.

3. The label of the sling is missing or is illegible, and the sling cannot be
positively identified.
4. Any of the load bearing fibres are damaged. Any damage to a cover
indicates potential damage to the load bearing core. Any cuts in the cover
should raise serious doubts as to the integrity of the load bearing core. Fibres
of a protective cover that are fused or glazed indicates that the sling has been
excessively heated (e.g. by friction in a choke hitch, by externally applied heat).

5. Chemicals have caused any damage (e.g. local weakening, softness of the cover, flaking of surface fibres). In such cases, damage to the load bearing core should be assumed.
6. Any coupling components or fittings are distorted, cracked, fractured or excessively worn or corroded.
7. If any other dangerous condition is confirmed.

DISCARD CRITERIA

Slings shall be immediately discarded if they are found to have any of the following faults:

1. The label of the sling is missing or is illegible, and the sling cannot be positively identified.

2. Whenever a sling has lost 10% or more of its minimum breaking strength. If there is any doubt as to the strength of the sling a method of establishing its loss of strength is given by Clause 9.4.2 of AS 1353.2.

3. Any of the load bearing fibres are damaged. Any damage to a cover indicates potential damage to the load bearing webbing. Such damage may be in the form of surface chafe or cuts in the cover. Any cuts in the cover should raise serious doubts as to the integrity of the load bearing webbing. Fibres of a protective cover that are fused or glazed indicates that the sling has been excessively heated (e.g. by friction in a choke hitch, by externally applied heat).

4. Chemicals have caused any damage (e.g. local weakening, softness of the cover, flaking of surface fibres). In such cases, damage to the load bearing webbing should be assumed.

5. Any coupling components or fittings are distorted, cracked, fractured or excessively worn or corroded.

6. If any other dangerous condition is confirmed.

CARE IN USE

Evaluation
When a sling has been withdrawn from service because of any doubt about its condition, its safety may be evaluated by a competent person. The competent
person may approve of the sling being returned to service, if the concern is considered to not affect the safety of the sling. The competent person may
recommend repair of the sling, provided the sling can be identified and it is considered that the load-bearing fibres have not been damaged.

Cleaning
If a sling requires cleaning, refer to Ranger for suitable cleaning methods.

Repairs
Slings having any of the faults listed must be discarded. The standard does not permit repairs to load-bearing webbing of a sling, but manufacturers may
replace labels and repair removable covers. Any repaired slings shall be proof load tested before being returned to service.